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Department Cellular Biochemistry - Prof. Ulrich Hartl

Protein folding is required for the realization of genetic information at the level of functional proteins and as such is one of the most fundamental reactions in all of biology. A specialized class of proteins, so called molecular chaperones, is essential for the successful folding of many cellular proteins. The Department of Cellular Biochemistry at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry is investigating the mechanisms of protein folding in the cell, and studies how the machinery of molecular chaperones assists in co- and post-translational protein folding.

However even chaperones cannot prevent that a fraction of proteins misfold and aggregate. Such protein misfolding is increased in the presence of disease-associated mutations, external stress factors or as a result of aging. If proteins aggregate, organisms employ additional factors to either disaggregate and re-solubilize them, or transform them into aggregate species that are less dangerous to the cell. This machinery, together with the chaperone systems, is referred to as the proteostasis network, since it maintains protein homeostasis. Within the framework of ToPAG, we plan to analyze the relationship between protein aggregates and the proteostasis network, and search for ways to increase the ability of this network to handle the challenges of protein misfolding and aggregation.

Group members:

  • Mark S. Hipp
    Project group leader
  • Roman Koerner
    Project group leader
  • Emmanuel Burghardt
    Technical assistant
  • Anastasia Jungclaus
    Technical assistant
  • Karsten Klage
    Postdoc
  • Peter Nagy
    Technical assistant
  • Stefan Pinkert
    Postdoc
  • Albert Ries
    Technical assistant
  • Lisa Vincenz
    PhD student
  • Andreas Woerner
    PhD student

More information: www.biochem.mpg.de/hartl

NEWS

International ToPAG Symposium on November 20th and 21st, 2017 - Full success!
On November 20th and 21st, ToPAG held its international Symposium on "Toxic Protein Aggregation in Neurodegeneration" at the Max Planck Institutes in Martinsried.
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Weeds in the brain
A common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s is the accumulation of toxic protein deposits in the nerve cells of patients. Once these aggregates appear, they begin to proliferate like weeds.
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TOPAG Symposium Toxic protein aggregation in neurodegeneration
November 20/21, 2017, at the MPIB, Martinsried
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Why nerve cells die
And what happens in a cell when Huntingtin, a protein associated with Huntington‘s disease, aggregates?
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2nd ToPAG retreat on Nov. 11/12, 2015 at Seeon/Chiemsee in Upper Bavaria
ToPAG retreat in Seeon discusses project progress
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